By Joe King, [email protected]

L-R: Sevier County Candidates Connie Holt, John Rulapaugh, Brian Gamble, Chuck Godfrey, and Buster Norton gather around Vote Here sign behind the polling line. (The Herald/ Joe King)

L-R: Sevier County Candidates Connie Holt, John Rulapaugh, Brian Gamble, Chuck Godfrey, and Buster Norton gather around Vote Here sign behind the polling line. (The Herald/ Joe King)

Although most of the local candidates were out at the Seymour voting locations for Primary Election Day May 6, many running for office seemed to gather a sense of voter apathy at the Seymour Primary School location.

“There’s not many people voting and it is disappointing,” said Sevier County Commissioner Buster Norton, who is running unopposed for Ninth District, Seat A. “I hope there are more in the evening. It is a shame that more people don’t vote, because after the election they come running about things not being right, but they were the ones who don’t vote. If you don’t vote, you don’t have a right to say anything.”

Similarly, Brian Gamble, who is running in a three-way race for Sevier County Commission Ninth District, Seat B, didn’t feel there were many coming to the polls.

“Turnout seems a little slow,” Gamble said. “I heard a count earlier that there has been 62 or 63, just before Noon, so it has been a slow start. I’m just out here trying to meet a few people who I haven’t had a chance to get to prior to the election. I hope today will be a good day.”

One of Gamble’s opponents, John Rualpaugh, also thought the turnout seemed sparse.

“Turnout seems to be a little lighter than expected this morning, but it is good to meet some more folks and others we have seen throughout the community,” Rulapaugh said.

Chuck Godfrey, also vying for the Ninth District’s Seat B, added turnout seemed a little off, but was pleased overall.

Andy Wallace, who was out campaigning for Sevier County General Session Clerk Jody Milks-West, took a moment to stress the importance of voting.

“Jody is a dear friend of mine,” Wallace said. “As you know I am a military veteran, so I esteem the value of voting because I have seen the price many of my fellow soldiers have paid. I count it as an honor to stand in a country and say here is who I am for.”

For the voters who were out early, they echoed Wallace’s passion for hitting the polls.

“I always vote because it is my God given right,” said Seymour resident Sandra Farley. “I just feel like a lot of people gave me this right and died doing, so I’m going to do it.”

Similarly, Seymour resident Roger Worthington was amped up to cast his vote for a candidate of his choice.

“I feel really confident my man Sheriff Ron Seals will get re-elected. I like him because he has been a good sheriff, I trust him, and I know his family,” said Roger Worthington.

However, Poll Worker Wilma Zovena said voting day participation seemed steady compared to early voting.

One Comment

  1. Elaine Goard says:

    It’s not apathy – it’s a matter of the date to vote not being advertised. What’s the use in signs all over and flyers in mailboxes when none state the date the vote?

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